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TIPS FROM TEACHERS
Choice Menu Boards
Rubric-for Tic-Tac-Toe Board
Tic-Tac-Toe Power Point

RECOMMENDED BOOKS FROM IMLEA BOARD MEMBERS

November, 2015  - Here's what people are reading at amle.org: Ideas to Help Students Develop Higher-Order QuestionsHere's what people are reading at amle.org: Ideas to Help Students Develop Higher-Order Questions

The following 3 books were recommended by Rita Turflinger, Assistant to the Supt., Ft. Wayne Community Schools, Middle Schools Area:

ADMINISTRATORS:
Crucial Conversations Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High,
Second Edition Paperback by Kerry Patterson , Joseph Grenny , Ron McMillan , Al Switzler
Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter Hardcover by Liz Wiseman, Greg Mckeown (Primary Contributor)
The Multiplier Effect: Tapping the Genius Inside Our Schools
Liz Wiseman, Lois N. Allen, Elise Foster

The following submitted by Ryan Nickoli, Principal, Tri-West MS, School to Watch, N W Hendricks School Corp., IMLEA Region 8 IMLEA Board Member

ADMINISTRATIVE
Shifting the Monkey by Todd Whitaker
Rethinking Leadership
Shaping School Culture by Terrence Deal 
Leading in a Culture of Change by Michael Fullan

TEACHERS
Rethinking Homework by Cathy Vatterott
What Great Teachers Do Differently by Todd Whitaker
Understanding a Framework of Poverty by Ruby Payne
Integrating Differentiated Instruction and Understanding by Design by Tomlinson and McTigheFailure is Not an Option by Alan Blankstein

The following submitted by: Jessica Tubbs, Assistant Principal, Creekside MS, Carmel, Reg.  5 IMLEA Board Member:

Teachers
Best Practices: Bringing Standards to life in America’s Classrooms by Steven Zemelman, Smokey Daniels, and Arthur Hyde
Good to Great by Jim Collins
Classroom Instruction that Works and A Handbook for Classroom Instruction that Works, both by Bob Marzano
Better Learning Through Structured Teaching by Doug Fisher and Nancy Frey
I Read but I don’t Get It by Cris Tovani
Theme Sets for Secondary Students by Jeannine Richison, Anita Hernandez and Marcia Carter\
Great Performances by Larry Lewin and Betty Jean Schemaker
Revisit, Reflect, Retell: Strategies for Improving Reading Comprehension by Linda Hoyt
A Repair Kit for Grading: 15 Fixes for Broken Grades by Ken O’Connor
When Kids Can’t Read What Teachers Can Do by Kylene Beers
Fair Isn’t Always Equal by Rick Wormeli
99 Ideas and Activities for Teaching English Learners with the SIOP Model by MaryEllen Vogt and Jana Echevarria

Administrators
Good to Great by Jim Collins
Strategies that Work (both first and second editions) by Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goudvis
What Works in Schools by Bob Marzano
Coaching Conversations and Opening the Door to Coaching Conversations, both by Linda Gross Cheliotes and Marceta Fleming Reily
Fair Isn’t Always Equal by Rick Wormeli
99 Ideas and Activities for Teaching English Learners with the SIOP Model by MaryEllen Vogt and Jana Echevarria

 

 

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{C}{C}{C}·        {C}{C}{C}STEM: Edible Cars Used to Teach Engineering Design

Who knew food could teach us so much about engineering a vehicle? Middle School science teacher Beth Manning used an unconventional activity to show her students how to be skillful designers. In the Teaching Channel video “STEM Design Challenge: Edible Cars,” her class created edible cars then raced them down a ramp to test whether they were as functional as they were delicious. Manning's goal was to “focus on the skills they used to make the car rather than the actual content [of the cars].” In addition to applying engineering design process, Manning emphasized that this project incorporated an ability to work in collaborative groups, research, ask questions, and effectively problem solve. If you sign up for the Teaching Channel, you can receive all the complementary materials that come along with the lesson, including the supplies list, contest rules, and a reflection sheet following the project. 

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  • Are your students more interested in Twitter than just about anything you're trying to teach them Today's digital natives experience the world in bite-sized chunks that can be quickly typed out in a text or tweeted out in 140 characters or less. So how can you leverage that in your classroom? Have students use the tweeting format to communicate your learning goals. For example, when teaching summary, have them write their summary in 140 characters or less. They will quickly learn to pull out only the most pertinent aspects of the story. In math, Common Core emphasizes communicating mathematical understanding, so have students 'show their work' by explaining their answer in 140 characters or less. For younger students, you may want to draw or type out 140 characters as a blackline master to help them use this format. Happy tweeting!  Lori Elliott, Ed.D. "The Accidental Techie"


 
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